Warner Bros. Pictures’ American superhero film based on the DC Comics antihero team of the same name, Suicide Squad hits theaters this Friday and the embargo has been lifted.

The third installment in the DC Extended Universe. Written and directed by David Ayer.

It stars an ensemble cast featuring Will Smith, Jared Leto, Margot Robbie, Joel Kinnaman, Jai Courtney, Cara Delevingne, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Karen Fukuhara, Jay Hernandez, Adam Beach, and Viola Davis.

As always we have rounded up reviews for you:

  • The Telegraph (40/100): When you compare Suicide Squad to what James Gunn and Marvel Studios achieved in Guardians of the Galaxy – low-profile property, oddball characters, make-it-fun brief – the film makes you cringe so hard your teeth come loose. But it’s a slog even on its own crushingly puerile terms.
  • The Hollywood Reporter (40/100): A puzzlingly confused undertaking that never becomes as cool as it thinks it is, Suicide Squad assembles an all-star team of supervillains and then doesn’t know what to do with them.
  • TheWrap (50/100): Writer-director David Ayer tries hard to make this dirty not-quite-dozen into an engaging band of misfits, but the results feel undercooked and overstuffed, with 10 pounds of supervillain backstory being crammed into a five-pound bag.
  • Movie Nation (50/100): The action beats are taut, but the story arc crumbles under the weight of all the movies it steals from. The casting fails to pop, in most instances.
  • Chicago Sun-Times (50/100): Suicide Squad does have its moments of beautiful comic-book visuals…. Those are just tantalizing hints of a better movie that never materialized.
  • Total Film (60/100): Starts off flavourful, turns rather bland. This Injustice League jaunt proves that DC is still a long way behind Marvel for on-screen action.
  • The Guardian (60/100): It’s a clotted and delirious film, with flashes of preposterous, operatic silliness. But it doesn’t have much room to breathe; there are some dull bits, and Leto’s Joker suffers in comparison with the late Heath Ledger.
  • New York Daily News (60/100): Fans will probably appreciate Suicide Squad for trying something different — and it gets bonus points for diversity — but the weaker characters and generally weak plot keep it from being one of the better comic book movies.
  • Entertainment Weekly (67/100): Writer-director David Ayer (End of Watch) skillfully sets up the film, introducing each of the crazies with caffeinated comic-book energy. But their mission…is a bit of a bust. The stakes should feel higher.
  • Village Voice (70/80): David Ayer’s film may not always work, but when it does, it’s a perverse delight.
  • Empire (80/100): Like Avengers Assemble forced through a Deadpool mangle, Suicide Squad gives new life to DC’s big-screen universe. So bad-to-the-bone it’s good.
  • Time Out London (80/100): In the end, the characters are more lasting than the story, which is a standard save-the-city-from-destruction yarn. But this crew is a riot, and their world is intriguing and even a little meaningful.
  • Hitfix (83/100): Suicide Squad is not the darkest mainstream superhero comic book movie ever made, nor is it even the darkest live-action film featuring Batman ever made. However, it is gleefully nihilistic, and it takes a different approach to what has become a fairly familiar story form at this point, right at the moment when it feels like superhero movies either have to evolve or die.
  • USA Today (88/100): Compared to its ilk, Suicide Squad is an excellently quirky, proudly raised middle finger to the staid superhero-movie establishment.

Produced by Charles Roven and Richard Suckle, with Zack Snyder, Deborah Snyder, Colin Wilson and Geoff Johns serving as executive producers.

Synopsis:
“It feels good to be bad… Assemble a team of the world’s most dangerous, incarcerated Super Villains, provide them with the most powerful arsenal at the government’s disposal, and send them off on a mission to defeat an enigmatic, insuperable entity.

U.S. intelligence officer Amanda Waller has determined only a secretly convened group of disparate, despicable individuals with next to nothing to lose will do.

However, once they realize they weren’t picked to succeed but chosen for their patent culpability when they inevitably fail, will the Suicide Squad resolve to die trying, or decide it’s every man for himself?”

Suicide Squad premiered in New York City on August 1 and will be theatrically released on August 5, 2016 in 2D, 3D, and IMAX 3D.

Suicide Squad Reviews Round-Up 1
Suicide Squad Reviews Round-Up 2
Suicide Squad Reviews Round-Up 3
Suicide Squad Reviews Round-Up 4

 

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Thanks, metacritic.com

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